By George Galloway

(source: Daily Record UK)

Rio, of course, is where we’re headed for the next World Cup (well maybe not us, but you know what I mean) before the tourney heads for the 120-degree hole of Qatar, which bought the championships wrapped up in brown paper.

Qatar, in fact, is buying everything, while their dictatorship lasts, including, it seems, the Arab League, which agreed to their demand for the suspension of Syria at the weekend to be followed this week by sanctions. You don’t have to like the Syrian regime to smell a rat here.

Not one of the Arab League potentates who suspended Syria has an elected leader, virtually all have ghastly human rights records. Every one of them, faced with an armed revolutionary insurrection in their own countries, would be gunning down the revolutionaries (the only difference being that they would be using guns sold to them by us).

The pot calling the kettle black doesn’t describe this farce. The Arab League is a bit like the Scottish second division – pathetic. When the Palestinians were being slaughtered in Gaza, they couldn’t agree to have a meeting about it.

When the Turkish prime minister Erdogan walked off the platform at Davos after denouncing Israeli president Peres as a “child-killer”, the Arab League leader stood up to applaud him, then sat down again to continue the show.

Given the impossibility of obtaining UN approval for an attack on Syria or Iran, it’s clear as the Qatar sky what’s going on. Arm and finance a group of revolutionaries and get them to start an uprising. When the state cracks down, get the opposition to call for western intervention. If the UN won’t authorise it, the corrupt dictators in the neighbourhood will do for a fig leaf.

It’s bombs away again, folks. We can’t keep our pensioners warm in the winter. But we can sure set fire to other people’s countries.

MRN

Author: MRN Network

The aspiration of the Media Review Network is to dispel the myths and stereotypes about Islam and Muslims and to foster bridges of understanding among the diverse people of our country. The Media Review Network believes that Muslim perspectives on issues impacting on South Africans are a prerequisite to a better appreciation of Islam.